Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, And 2 Spirit (MMIWG2S): A Crisis Rooted In The Continuation of Colonial Injustice

Health Sciences Learning Center, Room 1345
@ 11:30 am - 1:00 pm
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfpn6tm04clmdeiMtCo4LuRk8AHPbQgGysXbpN06IbTo1N7vg/viewform

This talk focuses on the intersections of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women/Relatives (MMIW/R) that impact health and wellbeing of Indigenous people and their communities including historical and contemporary roots of the MMIW/R crisis; practice implications for helper/ healer professions when working with survivors and their families; what the Wisconsin MMIW/R Taskforce is doing to address it.

Climate Optimism – Finding Creative Solutions and Making Positive Impacts

Virtual
@ 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
https://wirc.international.wisc.edu/climate-optimism/

This workshop will provide new ideas for teaching related to climate change to enable more optimistic approaches in the classroom and mitigate the phenomena of doomscrolling and "climate despair." Featured speakers will bring international, regional, and local expertise to our exchange to provide attendees with practical classroom activities, tangible examples of success, and suggestions for incorporating climate optimism outside of the science classroom. Zoom link to come by email.

Madison Area Green & Healthy Schools Conference

Lake View Elementary School, Madison, WI
@ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
https://sites.google.com/waee.org/maghss

Join environmental educators in the Madison area to explore topics in outdoor education, project-based learning, advocacy & justice, and environmental curricula. The conference is an opportunity to connect with the green and healthy schools movement, gain new ideas and get involved with community partners.

On Blackness, Liveliness, and What It Means to Be Human

Virtual
@ 12:00 pm
https://today.wisc.edu/events/view/195603

In “No Humans Involved: An Open Letter to My Colleagues,” Jamaican writer and theorist Sylvia Wynter critiques the social and human sciences for perpetuating social hierarchies, particularly through the Western humanist framing of “Man” as the universal representation of humanity. This talk extends Wynter’s critique to human development and academic knowledge production, arguing that Black specificity can create new possibilities for Black being.