University of Wisconsin–Madison

Leadership Certificate Info Packet

The University of Wisconsin-Madison recognizes the need for increasing the capacity of individuals to take leadership roles in all professions and sectors of society while on campus and beyond. It is our belief that leadership can be learned in formal classes, community-based leadership opportunities, mentoring and internship settings, as well as through a range of collaborative leadership activities.

The leadership certificate is based on four assumptions:

  • The University of Wisconsin-Madison is committed to developing the leadership capabilities within its community;
  • Effective leadership skills can be taught and learned at the university and in the community;
  • Leadership recognizes that context matters and each situation requires unique engagement.
  • Leadership is understood as the phenomenon of positive change in an individual, group, or community’s beliefs, values, or behaviors.

The Leadership Certificate’s definition of leadership aligns with the UW-Madison’s Leadership Framework and the principles that:

  • Leadership is an action-oriented endeavor and not based on position or level of authority.
  • It recognizes that context matters and each situation requires unique engagement.
  • Is understood as the phenomenon of positive change in an individual, group, or community’s beliefs, values, or behaviors.
  • Background

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison campus is steeped in excellence and tradition. This excellence is demonstrated through the competitive admissions process that brings exceptionally bright and talented students to the campus, as well as through the notable contributions that faculty, staff, and alumni have made through research, teaching and outreach to local, national, and international communities. The passing of the campus culture from one generation to the next – the traditions – are taught from the moment a student steps on campus and begins to absorb the rich history the campus has to offer to the first time they sing “Varsity” as a graduate. Woven throughout the student experience and the environment are monuments to the tradition of student activism and leadership on campus. Anyone who has spent a Friday afternoon on the Memorial Union Terrace, or walked down the lakeshore path to Picnic Point has profited from the strong student leadership on the UW-Madison campus. These two campus icons represent student initiatives and action that left a permanent imprint on the campus environment. Less obvious are the individual notations of student achievement. The Leadership Certificate has been created to capture the personal commitment for leadership development demonstrated by many of the student leaders on campus.

    This certificate is the product of the Student Leadership & Governance Work Group established by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at UW-Madison during 2002-2003. The broad-based Work Group was comprised of representatives from student governance, campus student leadership, colleges, the Dean of Students Office, the Wisconsin Union, the Morgridge Center, Interfraternity Council, University Housing, and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Office.
    In 2013 an on-campus working group made up of faculty, staff, and students formed in order to revise the Leadership Certificate and to align it with the UW-Madison Leadership Framework. The revised certificate was launched in the summer of 2015. The Certificate is administered through the Center for Leadership and Involvement at UW-Madison.

  • Qualifications

    To be considered for the Leadership Certificate, a student must:

    • Be a currently-enrolled UW-Madison undergraduate or graduate student in good standing
    • Be actively involved in leadership roles in organizations, work experiences, and in service to the community while on campus
    • Be able to document 100 hours of experience focused on leadership development
  • Application Requirements

    The Leadership Certificate application is housed in the Wisconsin Involvement Network (WIN). You will set up your application profile during an advising meeting with a CfLI Leadership Certificate advisor.

    The following is the order in which the application process takes place.

    1st Steps – Please complete the following steps in the order listed below:

    1. Attend in person or view an online Informational Session (see Prezi below)
    2. Complete the Leadership Competencies Activity
    3. Set up an advising appointment with Leadership Certificate Staff by reaching CfLI front desk at (608) 263-0365 or cfli@studentlife.wisc.edu.Topics to be discussed during the CfLI advising appointment
      • Review the Leadership Certificate and answer student questions about the application process
      • Explore how students’ past experiences may be used to meet Leadership Certificate requirements
      • Be ready to discuss the results from your completed Leadership Competencies Activity during your advising appointment.
      • Discuss potential reflection partner. Student should leave having an individual or list of individuals to contact for possible reflection partner.  Letter to Reflection Partner
      • How to use the online worksheets
      • Cover steps to achieving the certificate
      • Gain access to the Leadership Certificate Application
    Once the application process has begun:
    1. By the established deadline date, applicant submits the necessary forms and supplemental records through the online application.
    2. Leadership Application Materials are reviewed by the Leadership Review Committee consisting of students, faculty, and staff from UW-Madison. Students wishing to present their Leadership for Change Capstone will schedule a time through the Center for Leadership and Involvement; these typically occur the week following the application due date.
    3. After the due date, there will be a three-week period in which students will receive feedback from the Review Committee and have time to make the suggested revisions.
    4. Once an application has been accepted, the student will be notified by the Center for Leadership and Involvement.
  • Frequently Asked Questions

    Can the same event/activity be used for more than one Activity area?

    Answer: No, it is not permissible to earn hours in multiple Activity areas by using the same event/activity more than once. (Example: Badger Volunteer work may fit the Civic Engagement and Organizational/Group Leadership Activity Area but you can only use that experience once.)

    What is the recommended time line to complete the Leadership Certificate?

    Answer: We recommend four semesters to experience the full benefit of the program. In addition we have found the quality of the applications to improve when students work on the requirements across multiple years.

    Does everyone who applies receive the Leadership Certificate? 

    Answer: Not everyone. However, any student who meets the qualifications and essay standards (see our rubric for specifics) – including making satisfactory revisions to essays if requested by the review committee – will receive the Certificate.

    Can I use leadership experiences from my previous school?

    Answer: Yes. Transfer students are eligible to receive the Leadership Certificate and can use past leadership experiences from their previous school.

    Can I use leadership experiences/activities from high school?

    Answer: No. Students can use leadership experiences/activities starting from the summer prior to the start of their freshmen year in college.

    How do I obtain verification for the activities I submit?

    Answer: Students are required to provide contact information (name, email address and phone number) for an advisor/supervisor who has the knowledge to confirm the role and hours submitted.

    Does the Leadership Certificate appear on my academic transcript?

    Answer: No, but it can be included on your resume and your Leadership and Involvement Record.

    The Leadership and Involvement Record is an official document from the University of Wisconsin recording the leadership roles, student org involvement, or group membership students have had on campus. The record is not limited to student organizations but can include community service activities, intramural sports, research activities, and more. Offered through the Wisconsin Involvement Network (WIN), this document can be used to verify out-of-classroom activities to employers, assist with completing graduate school applications, provided to individuals writing letters of reference, and assist with the development of resumes.

    I see that there are 3 involvement requirements that include maximum hours. Do I have to do everything?

    Answer: Yes, you will need to complete something in every involvement requirement. Please note however, that there are 120 hours available across the 3 involvement requirement, even though you are only required to complete 100 hours. This allows you some leeway in the involvement requirements where you might be lacking hours.

    Can I e-mail you to see if my academic class will be accepted?

    Answer: Yes. Our review is based off the syllabus. If you have a question on whether or not we can accept your choice of class, send your request and syllabus along with a brief description of why you feel the course meets the required learning outcomes (rubric for Leadership Course and Global and Cultural Competence courses are listed on website) to leadership@studentlife.wisc.

    When are the deadlines to submit my completed application?

    Answer: The fall deadline is November 1 and the spring deadline is April 1.

    What do I need to do to prepare for writing my Competency essay?

    Answer: As you enter your activity area hours in your WIN application, there is space for you to reflect on which competencies you learned in the given activity. These reflections are intended to prepare you for the Competency essay.

    What is the Leadership for Change Capstone?

    Answer: The Leadership for Change Capstone is intended to synthesize student’s leadership experience on campus and their plan for continuous learning.  The Capstone encourages students to consider how they will apply their leadership learning to affect positive change in their communities by connecting the UW Madison’s Leadership Framework’s principals, values, competencies and outcomes to real world problems that require purposeful action.  May be a paper (2,500 words) or presentation (20 minutes).

    What do I need to verify my academic course?

    Answer: For verification you will need a transcript (does not need to be official) demonstrating you received a B or better in the course.

    Can philanthropy be considered civic engagement?

    Answer: No, although philanthropy is a worthy cause, the purpose of civic engagement is to emphasize engagement with community members that showcases your leadership skills.

    Can a service-learning course count for both the Academic Courses and Civic Engagement activity areas?

    Answer: No. Although a service-learning course could fulfill both academic courses and civic engagement, you must choose one activity area in which to use it.

    Is the orientation mandatory?

    Answer: Yes all student applicants must either attend an in-person orientation session or view the orientation online.

    Do I need to be a UW-Madison student to complete the Leadership Certificate?

    Answer: Yes. Undergraduate or graduate students are eligible to achieve the Certificate. Students must also have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 at the time of submission.

CALENDAR OF APPROVED EVENTS

Feb 18

All Campus Leadership Conference

February 18, 2018 @ 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Contact Us

Donna Freitag

Leadership Specialist/Marching Band Liaison
Center for Leadership and Involvement
3rd floor, Red Gym
E-mail: Leadership@studentlife.wisc.edu
Phone: (608) 890-2761
Fax: (608) 265-8184

Office Hours:
Please contact the CfLI front desk at cfli@studentlife.wisc.edu or call 608-263-0365 to make an appointment.

Important Dates

Leadership Certificate Orientation Sessions:

  • Tuesday, February 20, 2018
  • Wednesday, February 21, 2018
  • Tuesday, March 6, 2018

Note: All sessions are scheduled from 6:30-7:30pm in the Masley Media Room, Red Gym.

Spring 2018 Application Deadline
April 1st by 11:59pm

Leadership Certificate Ceremony
May 2, 2018
5:30pm-7:00pm
Gordon Commons

Program Components

Involvement Requirements

Completion of 100 hours divided between the 3 areas of: Civic Engagement (Max: 40 hours), Organizational/Group Leadership (Max: 50 hours), Trainings & Workshops (Max: 30 hours).

Educational Requirements

Academic Course: Complete one academic course with a B or above, either in Leadership Studies OR Global and Cultural Competence, from the approved list (see below).

Online Modules: Complete three of five online modules and write reflection essays for each.

Reflection Requirements

Competencies Reflection: Write one three-part essay reflecting on the seven UW-Madison Leadership competencies and develop an action plan for future growth.

Leadership for Change Capstone: This can be done as an essay or presentation.

Reflection Partner

At the beginning of the Leadership Certificate program, we encourage you to identify a reflection partner with whom you are comfortable sharing your leadership journey and campus experiences. Your self-chosen reflection partner will help facilitate your progress through the Certificate, providing an objective opinion to help guide you in your own leadership growth.”

Bascom Hall

Involvement Requirements

  • Organizational/Group Leadership

    Organizational/Group Leadership (50 hours max)

    Applicants should actively participate on a team, within an organization, or as a member of a work unit in a manner that demonstrates Integrity;
    Inclusive engagement; and Connection and Community. Submissions must demonstrate leadership as an action-oriented endeavor (note that this does NOT need to be a titled position) that facilitates the accomplishment of goals, empowers others to act, and fosters positive social change in group members, the organization, the campus and the community.

    Verification:
    1. Position description/expectations
    2. Provide contact information from an advisor/supervisor who can confirm your activity role and hours submitted are correct
    Examples may include:
    • ASM (Associated Students of Madison)
    • Army ROTC,
    • Club Team Sports
    • House Fellow Positions
    • Intermural Student Supervisor
    • Internships
    • Morgridge Center Staff Positions
    • Paid and Unpaid Leadership Positions
    • SLP Coordinators (Student Leadership Program)
    • SOAR New Student Leader
    • Student Leadership Program Committee Chair
    • Teach For America
    • Unpaid or paid internships
    • Varsity Athletes-list sport participating in and give a brief explanation of the responsibilities related to your sport (eg. practices, film sessions, weight training, games, etc.)
    • And many more…..
  • Civic Engagement

    Civic Engagement (40 hours max)

    Civic Engagement is the process of working together to build thriving communities. You should develop the ability to work effectively in a variety of communities and contexts by listening, considering and responding to differences in each unique engagement.

    Strong community members recognize the value that each of us bring to the table and work to move ideas into action rather than using a top-down approach. Service leadership requires working with communities, rather than on communities. You should be actively engaged by developing an ongoing and mutually beneficial relationship with a community entity. These experiences should also challenge you to learn about and more deeply understand yourself and how you relate to others in your community. You should reflect on and be able to articulate why, as a leader, you feel it is important to engage with your community and how you grew from being involved.

    Verification:
    1. Volunteer position description & agency description including mission.
    2. Provide contact information from an advisor/supervisor who can confirm your activity role and hours submitted is correct.
    3. Non-credit and unpaid position
    4. At least 50% of total hours submitted are completed through same service agency and 50% of time must be off-campus
    Examples may include:
    • On-going direct service volunteer work
    • Alternative Break trips
    • Serving long-term on a community committee/board
    • Contributing to a political/issues campaign by coordinating outreach
    • Unpaid camp counselor or volunteer
    • Participating in Badger Volunteers
    • Coordinating patient happiness programming with hospital staff and outside organizations
    • Recruiting, training and coordinating tutors for local public school students
    • Serving on a committee to support and coordinate a philanthropy event
    • For more ideas visit www.volunteeryourtime.org
    • Hours of service completed through a service learning course
    • And many more….
    For the purposes of the Leadership Certificate, civic engagement does not include:
    • Philanthropic donations
    • Running a race for a cause
    • Donating blood
  • Trainings & Workshops

    Trainings & Workshops (30 hours max)

    Non-credit Leadership learning opportunities such as workshops, seminars and conferences available on or off campus. Workshops or trainings should promote learning and growth in one or more of the seven UW-Madison leadership competencies. Kindly refer to Calendar of Approved Events. Note: Unless it is listed in our examples above, you will need to confirm the eligibility of the training or workshop with our staff before submitting your application. The easiest way to accomplish this is send us an email with information (itinerary, website link, description) about the training or workshop in question.

    Verification:

    1. Provide itinerary/program of each activity (seminar, workshop, conference etc

    Examples may include: (not an exhaustive list)
    • Adventure Learning Programs (ALPS)
    • All Campus Leadership Conference and other events hosted by Student Leadership Program (SLP)
    • Emerging Leaders Program
    • LeaderShape Institute: Accenture Leadership Center
    • LGBT Leadership Institute
    • International Institute events and workshops
    • Social Justice 101 workshop and Ijet Series (hosted by the Multicultural Student Center)
    • Student organization retreats & summits
    • UW Housing Leadership Confernce
    • Willis Jones Leadership Center at the Wisconsin Union workshops
    • Women’s Leadership Conference
    • WUD Retreat
    • Green Dot Training
    • And many more…..
    Resources:

    This is neither an exhaustive list nor does every event advertised on these sites qualify for the Leadership Certificate.  We provide this list as an aid in searching for potential trainings and workshops.

    Center for Leadership and Involvement:  https://cfli.wisc.edu/

    International Institute:  https://iris.wisc.edu/

    Leadershare Resource Directory: https://apps.leadership.wisc.edu/resourcedirectory

    LGBTQ Campus Center:  http://lgbt.wisc.edu/

    Morgridge Center for Public Service:  https://morgridge.wisc.edu/

    Multicultural Student Center:  http://msc.wisc.edu/

    Office of Student-Athlete Development: http://www.uwbadgers.com/sports/2015/8/21/GEN_20140101128.aspx

    Student Leadership Center, College of Engineering: http://slc.engr.wisc.edu/

    Accenture Leadership Center, School of Business: http://bus.wisc.edu/bba/mybiz/leadership-student-orgs/accenture-leadership-center

    Willis Jones Leadership Center at the Wisconsin Union: http://www.union.wisc.edu/wjlc-about.ht

Educational Requirements

  • Academic Course

    Academic Course

    Complete one academic course with a B or above, either in Leadership Studies OR Global and Cultural Competence, from the approved lists below.

    Leadership Course Description and Course List

    Leadership- the ability to mobilize the self and others toward a common goal; an action, not a position; mobilization that creates an impact on individuals, student organizations, and the community in a positive, permanent way. The focus is on leadership as an “action-oriented endeavor that provides positive change and is not necessarily based on position or level of authority” (University of Wisconsin Madison’s Leadership Framework, http://leadership.wisc.edu/) and considers the context in which the action occurs.

    The following learning outcomes distinguish core components of what the Leadership Certificate deems an appropriate exploration of “leadership.”

    Course’s learning outcomes must demonstrate:

    • Academic rigor that includes leadership content mastery as well as critical leadership thinking skills demonstrated through the course leadership learning objectives and course content at a level of quality and complexity to stimulate critical thinking skills.
    • Research and examination of historical and/or contemporary leadership theory (i.e., the UW-Madison’s Leadership Framework), the Social Change model, the Servant Leadership model etc.)
    • Intentional leadership learning: defined as examining the self in regards to individual leadership, group leadership, and community leadership
    • Learning objectives or course materials that are identified on the syllabus and specifically tied to the competency(s) and value(s) of the UW-Madison Leadership Framework

    Verification points for Academic Course:

    • Readings, assignments, projects, and speakers where the focus of learning is based on leadership
    • Submit a transcript that indicates you received a 3.0 or better in the course

    Note: This does not include academic courses where grading is based on participation in a leadership role or where the focus is on other skill sets (examples might include teaching or helping skills) and leadership is implied but not a specific focus. Additional examples that do not meet the leadership course requirements are leading discussions, teaching a class, providing service in the community, internships, participation in structured groups, class projects, tutoring etc. These skill-based classroom activities might fit the “Organizational/Group Leadership” requirement area.

    The following courses fit the leadership course learning outcomes for the Leadership Certificate. If you feel that a class you are taking fits the learning outcomes above and is not included in the list below, send your syllabus and professor contact information (name, e-mail, phone, and academic department) to leadership@studentlife.wisc.edu. Make sure to identify specifically how the proposed course meets the Leadership Certificate requirements. If you would like to use a class from another institution, it must appear on your UW-Madison official transcript.

    Approved Leadership Courses

    Global and Cultural Competence Course Description and Course List

    Global and Cultural Competence is the ability to work and communicate effectively in a variety of cultures and languages; the proclivity to engage in solving critical global and/or cultural issues, and a willingness to see the world from a perspective other than one’s own; a life-long process. (Van Eyck, Masarah. “Global Views.” On Wisconsin 19 Jan 2010. 23-31.).

    The following learning outcomes distinguish core components of what the Leadership Certificate deems an appropriate exploration of “global competence and cultural competence.”

    Course’s learning outcomes must give students the opportunity to engage with the following:

    • Academic rigor that includes mastery of content relevant to global competence as well as critical global thinking skills demonstrated through the course learning objectives and course content at a level of quality and complexity to stimulate critical thinking skills.
    • Ability to work effectively in a variety of cultures
    • Effective communication across linguistic and/or cultural boundaries
    • See/understand the world from a perspective other than the self
    • Understand and appreciate the diversity of society and cultures
    • Opportunities to gain knowledge, a mental openness
    • Learning objectives or course materials that are identified on the syllabus and specifically tied to the competency(s) and value(s) of the UW-Madison Leadership Framework

    Verification points for Academic Course:

    • Readings, assignments, projects, and speakers where the focus of learning is based on global competence
    • Submit a transcript that indicates that you received a 3.0 or better in the course

    The following courses fit the Global Competence learning outcomes for the Leadership Certificate. If you feel that a class you are taking fits the learning outcomes above and is not included in the list below, send your syllabus and professor contact information (name, e-mail, phone, academic department) to leadership@studentlife.wisc.edu. Make sure to identify specifically how the proposed course meets the Leadership Certificate requirements. If you would like to use a course from another institution, it must show up on your official UW-Madison transcript.

    Approved Global and Cultural Courses

  • Online Modules

    Online Modules

    The Online Learning Modules are websites that have been selected for their excellent content and relevance for the Leadership Certificate. Additionally they offer avenues for you to pinpoint competencies and values.

    Instructions:

    1) Complete the required Module 1 on Global and Cultural Competence and respond to the corresponding prompt.

    “The Danger of a Single Story” TED Talk by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
    https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story
    Student Learning Activity – Watch the video and then write a one-page (250 word minimum) response paper.  Consider the significance of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s talk as you answer the following questions in the form of an essay.

    • Briefly describe what the danger of a single story is as you understand it (short paragraph).
    • If you’ve had this experience personally, please feel free to explain/explore your experience and how it informs your leadership roles. If not, please discuss ways in which you as a leader can attempt to address stereotypes and the idea that they “make one story become the only story.”

    In your essay, make sure to use at least one example of your own leadership experiences and tie it to at least one competency and/or value from the UW-Madison Leadership Framework.

    2) Choose two modules from the list below and respond to the corresponding prompt.

    A) The Art & Science of Leadership
    http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/leader/leader.html
    Student Learning Activity – Read five of the thirteen chapters listed under “Basics of Leadership.” Then write a one-page (250 word minimum) response paper.  Of the five chapters you chose to read, which of them resonated with you the most and why? Explain what the topic was, connect it to your own leadership experiences using at least one example, and tie it to at least one competency and/or value from the UW-Madison Leadership Framework.

    B) “Learning from Leadership’s Missing Manual” TED Talk by Fields Wicker-Miurin.
    http://www.ted.com/talks/fields_wicker_miurin_learning_from_leadership_s_missing_manual?lalangua=en
    Student Learning Activity– Watch the video and then write a one-page (250 word minimum) response paper. Consider the significance of Fields Wicker-Miurin talk as you answer the following questions in the form of an essay.

    • Briefly describe how you understand what leadership’s missing manual is (short paragraph).
    • Please pick one of the following descriptions of the missing manual used by the leaders Wicker-Miurin and explain how it reflects or relates to your view of leadership. Be sure to use an example from your own experiences and tie it to at least one competency and/or value from the UW-Madison Leadership Framework.
      • “…they looked outside and then they changed what was on the inside…”
      • “…they’ve built bridges and they’ve walked across them…”
      • “…they’ve tried to connect worlds they didn’t know existed before…”
      • “…it’s not about them,… but it has to start with them…”
    C) “Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Action” TED Talk by Simon Sinek
    Student Learning Activity– Watch the video and then write a one-page (250 word minimum) response paper. After listening to Simon Sinek’s TED talk, write an essay that addresses the following questions:
    • Briefly describe how you understand Sinek’s Golden Circle (short paragraph).
    • Explain how the following quote reflects or relates to your view of leadership. Be sure to use an example from your own experiences and tie it to at least one competency and/or value from the UW-Madison Leadership Framework.
      • “There are leaders and there are those who lead; leaders hold a position of power or authority, but those who lead inspire us.”
    D) “The Difference between winning and succeeding” TED Talk by John Wooden
    Student Learning Activity– Watch the video and then write a one-page (250 word) response paper. Consider Wooden’s talk as you answer the following questions in the form of an essay.
    • Briefly describe how you understand Wooden’s explanation of the difference between winning and succeeding (short paragraph).
    • Apply Wooden’s definition of success (at 3 minute mark) to an example of your own experiences and tie it to at least one competency and/or value from the UW-Madison Leadership Framework.
     
    Important: Assume that the reviewer is familiar with the module. Do not explain what the video says, but rather how what is said is relevant for your own leadership development.
     
    Online Modules Rubric
    The following rubric will be used by the review committee to assess your reflections. Make sure to follow its guidelines!
     Criteria Expectation
     Depth of Reflection  Response focuses more on what applicant has learned than on what they saw/read. The paper should avoid regurgitating information and instead focus on what the applicant has learned from the module. Paper should explicitly discuss at least one competency or value associated with the UW-Madison Leadership Framework.
     Application  Applicant displays ways in which they have, or can, use what they have learned in their own leadership activities.
     Use of Examples  Essay provides clear and relevant examples, drawn from their Leadership Certificate experience, to support their reflections.
     Clarifying and Formatting  Response paper clearly address the prompts and are free of grammar and spelling errors. The content is well-organized and logically developed. Essays are one-page in length (250 word minimum) including a cover page with name, date, and title of essay.

Reflection Requirements

  • Competency Essay

    Competency Essay

    The UW-Madison Leadership Framework presents a working understanding of how to engage in the act of Leadership – understood as the phenomenon of change in an individual, group, or communities’ beliefs, values, or behaviors.  The Leadership Framework is built on three key assumptions.

    1. Leadership generates observable outcomes
    2. These outcomes are informed by three key values of UW Madison: integrity of the individual, inclusive engagement of others and connection to broader community
    3. These outcomes occur as the individual develops certain leadership competencies, specifically:

    SELF-AWARENESS
    Consistently self-reflecting in order to reveal strengths, limitations, beliefs, values, and attitudes that generate engagement; Committing to personal development in order to provide greater understanding of multiple identities and experiences that affect the ability to facilitate change

    INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION
    Developing essential relationships through listening, considering, and responding to the needs of individuals and the situation; Having the ability to communicate in tactful, compassionate, and sensitive ways to enable these relationships to evolve

    SUPPORTING LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT OF OTHERS
    Developing the capacity and engagement of individuals and groups through feedback and coaching

    HONORING CONTEXT AND CULTURE
    Seeking to understand the organization, culture, system, politics, and dynamics, and their influence on actions needed to achieve the group’s goals

    DECISION-MAKING
    Arriving at decisions that impact others and the organization in which the decisions are made; Employing critical and strategic thinking to enable creative solutions to be considered and pursued; Recognizing that with important systemic dimensions, analysis and ideas from multiple sources give way to implementation and evaluation

    FOSTERING BRIDGE-BUILDING AND COLLABORATION
    Through cooperative participation, encouraging everyone to take ownership of the work that is being done and the outcomes that are created; Creating an environment where differences are appreciated, knowing that conflict can serve to expose new solutions to complex problems

    MOVING IDEAS INTO ACTION
    Offering a compelling vision that inspires groups to engage in the ambiguous transformation process; Being aware that co-creation processes focused on common goals require steady, yet flexible, interventions based on evaluation and the needs of the group

    An individual’s relationship to these competencies exists on a continuum.  Understanding of, expertise with, and skillful application of the competencies are demonstrated at varying degrees.

    Directions:

    A) Your responses to the essay question should focus on experiences gained through the process of fulfilling the Leadership Certificate requirements (Involvement and Educational)
    B) Between section 1 and section 2, please be sure to reflect on all seven competencies and consider each of them within the context of change.  It may be helpful to rank your understanding of, experience with, and application of the competencies first and then decide which you will include in section 1 and which you will include in section 2.  Please label each section of your essay. (At the same time, do not worry if the sections blend together to some extent: for example, if may feel natural to discuss ways you want to grow in section 2, even though that is the prompt for section 3.)
    C) Word Count: Section 1 and 2 must consist of a minimum of 1500 words and section 3 a minimum of 500 words.  Total word count needs to fall between 2000 and 2500 words.
    D) Strong essays address each competency thoroughly and provides concrete examples sharing what happened and an explanation of how you’ve grown in that area.  Essays will be evaluated according to the following criteria.
    • Clarity: Your essay should clearly address the prompt and be free of grammar and spelling errors.  The content should be well-organized and logically developed.
    • Evidence of Growth:  Your essay should display ways in which you grew in your understanding of, abilities in, or appreciation of your competencies within the context of change.
    • Depth of Reflection:  Your essay should focus more on the what you learned than on what you did.  You should also explain the process of how you learned the given competency.  It should exhibit your ability to reflect upon your activities and competencies.
    • Use of Examples: Your essay should provide clear and relevant examples, drawn from your Leadership Certificate experience, to support your reflections.
    • Formatting Guidelines: Include a cover page with your name, date, and title of essay.  Include section headings when possible to break up the essay for the reviewer.  Clearly state which competency you are discussing.

    Essay Questions

    Section 1:
    With which competency/competencies do you feel more confident and why?  As you answer this question, please share experiences that gave you a chance to excel, grow, or be challenged.
    Section 2:
    With which competency/competencies do you feel least confident?  How did this knowledge come to your awareness?  How has this affected your leadership?  Please provide specific examples.
    Section 3:
    Choose one competency and share your plan for how you will improve upon it in the future.  Perhaps this is a competency in which you feel confident and would like to continue to develop.  Perhaps it is one in which you feel lacking, or haven’t had much experience in, and would like to think of ways to address this as you move on from the UW.  What is your plan in managing frustration, uncertainty, or even failure along the way?
     
    Leadership Certificate Competency Essay Rubric
    The following rubric will be used by the review committee to assess your essay. Make sure to follow its guidelines!
    Criteria  Expectation (Corresponding prompt in parentheses)
    Depth of Reflection  Essay focuses more on what applicant has learned than on what they did. Applicant explains the process of how they learned the relevant competency.  Essay should exhibit applicant’s ability to reflect upon their activities and competencies. (With which competency/competencies do you feel most/least confident and why? How has this affected your leadership?)
    Evidence of Growth  Applicant displays ways in which they grew in their understanding of, abilities in, or appreciation of their competencies. (Share experiences that gave you a chance to excel, grow or be challenged. )
    Use of Examples  Essay provides clear and relevant examples, drawn from their Leadership Certificate experience, to support their reflections. (Please provide specific examples supporting your essay.)
    Conclusion  Essay comes to a clear and logical conclusion, while also explaining future plans for improving upon chosen competency in applicant’s life. ( Share plans for improving upon one competency as you move on from the UW. What is your plan in managing frustration, uncertainty or even failure along the way?)
    Clarity and formatting  Essay addresses the prompts clearly, articulately, and concisely. Essay also follows formatting parameters.  Include a cover page with your name, date, and title of essay.  Include section headings when possible to break up the essay for the reviewer.  Clearly state which competency you are discussing. (2,000-2,500 words total)
  • Leadership for Change Capstone

    Leadership for Change Capstone

    The Leadership Certificate program culminates with a Capstone that encourages students to consider how they will apply their leadership learning to affect positive change in their communities. The Capstone enables students to connect their passion to a purpose by identifying a change they seek while engaging intentionally with their community.

    The Capstone is structured to assist students in connecting the Framework’s Principles, Values, Competencies and Outcomes to real world problems that require purposeful action.

    The Capstone brings to life the following Leadership Framework principles:

    • Leadership is an action-oriented endeavor not based on position or level of authority
    • That context matters and each situation requires unique engagement
    • Leadership is understood as the phenomenon of positive change in an individual, group, or community’s beliefs, values, or behaviors

    The Capstone provides an opportunity to explore in greater depth how a specific Leadership Framework Value can spur the change that you seek. The Framework’s three (3) Values are a set of cultural beliefs or ideals that are consistent with our University’s history and mission. They serve as a foundation for the Leadership Framework and help to support the work of leadership development and leadership outcomes.

    Your Change Capstone:

    • May be a paper (2,000-2,500 words) or presentation (20 minutes)
    • Is intended to synthesize your leadership experience on campus and your plan for continuous learning
    • Draws upon your leadership learning for the purpose of engaging in intentional change.

    Experience – – > Learning – – > Purposeful Application – – > Change


    Directions

    For your Capstone project, identify a positive change you seek within a group or community’s beliefs, values, or behaviors. Please use the UW-Madison Leadership Framework which includes Competencies, Values, and Outcomes to assist you with your Capstone reflection.

    Preparing Your Capstone

    • Identify a positive change you seek within a group or community’s beliefs, values, or behaviors. Consider something you are passionate about. Call upon lessons learned from past leadership experiences that are transferable to this change initiative.
    • Your change initiative can be something you are currently doing or something you would like to do in the future.
    • Select one Value and three to four (3-4) Competencies as defined within the Leadership Framework that advances your change initiative.
    • Review the specific Leadership Framework outcomes that align with the Values and Competencies that you have selected. Please feel free to include additional Outcomes that are not listed.

    Capstone Prompts   

    The title and opening of your essay/presentation should include the following.

    1. What is your positive change initiative? (Can be something you are currently doing or something you would like to do in the future. See examples for further details)
    2. What are the beliefs, values or behaviors you seek to change?
    3. In what context are you hoping to achieve positive change?
    4. What is your motivation behind creating this change?

    The questions listed below will serve as the content of your essay/presentation

    • Which one Leadership Value and three to four (3-4) Competencies will best assist you in creating this change? Note: It will be helpful to review the specific Outcomes when determining which Value and Competencies best align with your change initiative. (See Leadership Framework).
    • Why did you select this Value and what does it mean to you? Please call upon past leadership experiences and explain how the knowledge, skills, and abilities you gained will be transferable to the change that you seek?
    • Why did you select these Competencies and what do they mean to you? Please call upon past leadership experiences and explain how the knowledge you gained is transferable to the change that you seek?
    • What will success look like? (Note: some issues are more concretely measurable in their success than others)
    • How will this change be sustained over time and what role do you anticipate playing in that effort?
    • What challenge(s) do you foresee and how will you plan to manage these challenge(s)?
    • What support will you need throughout this process and how will you access that support?

     Examples of Positive Change Initiatives

    Example of Capstone – Presentation

    Leadership for Change Capstone rubric

Reflection Partner

  • Reflection Partner

    At the beginning of the Leadership Certificate program, we encourage you to identify a reflection partner with whom you are comfortable sharing your leadership journey and campus experiences. Your self-chosen reflection partner will help facilitate your progress through the Certificate, providing an objective opinion to help guide you in your own leadership growth. With a trusted reflection partner to guide you, you will enjoy the full benefit of the program by engaging in a constructive and supportive dialogue of your personal experiences. This experience will also give you insight into your own leadership role as a mentor and an advisor in the lives of others.

    Choosing your reflection partner

    A reflection partner is a person who you trust and who knows you well. Your reflection partner should be someone who will be completely honest with you, providing constructive criticism to help you reflect on your strengths and your areas for growth. You should choose someone with whom you can speak openly, and who will provide suggestions and ideas that you respect and trust. When seeking a reflection partner, you should identify a person who is willing to discuss your leadership journey with you, and who will be available to meet multiple times.

    • Your reflection partner does not have to be affiliated with the University.
    • Examples include: fellow student, teacher, family relative, colleague, job or volunteer supervisor, teammate, etc.

    *If you would like help finding a reflection partner, we encourage you to reach out to the CfLI Leadership Certificate staff to help you in your search.

    Tips for approaching your reflection partner

    • Provide a brief overview of the program.
    • Tell them your goals for the reflection partner meeting and why you think they would be a good reflection partner for you.
    • After meeting with your reflection partner, follow up regularly to keep your reflection partner updated on your progress.
    • Send a thank you letter or note

    Letter to Reflection Partner

    Meeting with your reflection partner

    We encourage you to meet with your reflection partner at least twice during the program.